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Daniel Perez


software engineer interested in programming languages and functional programming


  1. What's coming in Elixir 1.3

    I recently gave a talk about Elixir 1.3 in Tokyo, and spoke about the changes, new features, improvements and all the awesome stuff coming in Elixir 1.3. I decided to write this as a blog post, with a little more details, and some links for those who want to check in more details. …


  2. Use Atom to edit in Chrome

    After GitHub added plenty of shortcuts to edit markdown in the browser, I had some problem editing directly, having all the native Emacs like shortcuts overridden. …


  3. Run commands only on git update with Ansible

    I have recently switched my automation workflow from Chef to Ansible, and just bumped into a simple issue. …


  4. Persistent history in Elixir repl IEx

    Recently I am starting to use Elixir a bit more seriously, and a small issue I had was that Elixir repl, IEx, history does not persist between sessions. Being used to repl like ipython or pry which do that out of the box, I wanted to have this functionality, which is in my opinion very convenient. …


  5. Image orientation bug with Picasso

    Short memo about an issue I just had some issue on Android with Picasso library when loading an image from a URI on KitKat. …


  6. Go serialization

    I have been using Golang to build some REST API recently, and I was having some trouble to serialize my data properly to JSON. …


  7. SSH invalid byte sequence

    Small memo about an issue I had with Chef knife and Capistrano commands. …


  8. Optional parameters and decorators in JavaScript

    Optional parameters is a widely used programming pattern and is available by default in many languages. For example, an example in Python could be: …


  9. Grunt errors in browser

    I have been using Grunt for quite a while, but I had never found anything to handle compile errors, to show them in the web browser, for example. …


  10. Scala's parser combinator

    After playing around a little recently with Scala’s parser combinator, I tried to implement a small calculator-like program using them to see how easily it could be done. The result is quite impressive, with about 100 lines of code we can get something working pretty fine. …